News Hooks

Campaign Media

Irony of satire: Political ideology and the motivation to see what you want to see in The Colbert Report

Source: JournalistsResource.org

Political humor has a long tradition in America, but ironical “fake news” is a phenomenon that distinguishes the current cultural moment. Indeed, in recent years a whole body of scholarly literature has focused on this field of political entertainment and its effects. A 2011 study from scholars at Ohio State University adds to this literature by examining how precisely such satire registers differently among liberals and conservatives — how humor is filtered through certain predispositions.

Political involvement during 2016 presidential election wasn't very different

Source: JournalistsResource.org

New research contradicts claims media organizations and political commentators have made about unusually high levels of political involvement among the public during the 2016 presidential election.

The study finds that public interest and voter engagement in 2016 closely matched that of previous elections.

5 takeaways from First Draft's identifying misinformation course

Source: JournalistsResource.org

A new online course from First Draft helps journalists use free tools to track down, source and verify information they find online.

 A video appears to show regime planes bombing civilians in Syria; someone who looks much like a beloved professor appears holding a torch at a neo-Nazi rally. If credible, these are leads. But how do we know if they are credible?